California Corner: Loss of Use under Commercial General Liability Insurance Policies Includes the Inability to Use a Property in a Particular Manner

Julia K. Holt

Most commercial general liability (“CGL”) policies contain standard, insurance industry-drafted language regarding an insurer’s duty to defend and indemnify its insured. The language typically states something like, the insurer “will pay those sums that the insured becomes legally obligated to pay as damages because of . . . ‘property damage’ to which this insurance applies. We will have the right and duty to defend the insured against any ‘suit’ seeking those damages.” Commercial General Liability Insurance Policy Form No. CG 00 01 04 13, § I, Coverage A.1.a. (Insurance Services Office, Inc. 2012). “Property Damage” is defined as “[p]hysical injury to tangible property, including all resulting loss of use of that property” or “[l]oss of use of tangible property that is not physically injured.” Id. at § V, ¶ 17.a and b.

The second definition of “property damage” provides coverage when the allegations do not amount to physical injury of tangible property. However, insurers often attempt to strictly narrow the coverage available by arguing that certain types of lost use are not covered because they are merely the loss of economic privileges that accompany the property, such as the right to hold a liquor license or to use the property a certain way via a permit. In other words, insurers often argue that “loss of use” of tangible property requires the total loss of all uses on the property, not merely some uses. The California Court of Appeal recently rejected this argument. See Thee Sombrero, Inc. v. Scottsdale Ins. Co., 28 Cal. App. 5th 729, 239 Cal. Rptr. 3d 416 (2018). Continue reading “California Corner: Loss of Use under Commercial General Liability Insurance Policies Includes the Inability to Use a Property in a Particular Manner”

CGL Coverage for Cyber Data Breaches: Court Finds No Coverage unless the Policyholder Itself Publishes the Private Information

Deborah Greenspan

As cybersecurity incidents continue to mount and as the issue of data security becomes increasingly important and a source of potential liability, companies should consider whether their standard commercial general liability (“CGL”) policies provide adequate coverage. The case law, although limited, suggests that policyholders might face an uphill battle in obtaining coverage.

In Innovak International, Inc. v. The Hanover Insurance Company, No. 8:16-cv-2453-MSS-JSS, — F. Supp. 3d —, 2017 WL 5632718 (M.D. Fla. Nov. 17, 2017), the Court found that the insurer was not required to provide a defense to the policyholder because the underlying complaint did not allege that the policyholder published the private data. Innovak develops and markets accounting and payroll software and maintains a database accessible via Internet portals. The complaint alleged that as a result of Innovak’s negligence, hackers were able to access class members’ personal information, including social security numbers, addresses, dates of birth, telephone numbers, employment information, and spousal information. The complaint included claims for negligence, breach of implied contract, gross negligence, unjust enrichment, and fraudulent suppression. The claimants alleged that they suffered psychic injuries including stress, nuisance, loss of sleep, worry, and the annoyance of dealing with the data breach. Continue reading “CGL Coverage for Cyber Data Breaches: Court Finds No Coverage unless the Policyholder Itself Publishes the Private Information”