Insurance Can Reduce the Financial Repercussions to Your Supply Chain of Superstorms, Wildfires, Climate Change, and Global Economic Disruptions

Welcome to “California Corner,” dedicated to posts authored by our new team of Insurance Recovery attorneys based in our Los Angeles office. Partner Linda Kornfeld, who serves as vice chair of the Insurance Recovery group, Partner David Thomas and Of Counsel Julia Holt focus on national and California-specific issues, including property and weather-related business interruption issues, data breach and privacy issues, and professional liability, asbestos, and environmental liabilities. Their clients include telecommunications companies, universities, real estate developers, manufacturers, and nonprofit organizations around the country. We hope you find their perspectives informative and insightful!

Linda Kornfeld, David Thomas, and Julia Holt

Many companies in today’s global economy are dependent upon the efficient and disruption-free operation of their multinational supply chains. Unfortunately, such supply chains are vulnerable to numerous physical and non-physical elements, including natural disasters, information technology failures, cyberattacks, pandemics, climate change, and civil and political unrest. These vulnerabilities can, and often do, result in the disruption of business operations resulting in significant financial losses. Continue reading “Insurance Can Reduce the Financial Repercussions to Your Supply Chain of Superstorms, Wildfires, Climate Change, and Global Economic Disruptions”

Insurance Coverage for Workplace Sexual Harassment Claims

Jared Zola and James R. Murray

The last several weeks have brought seemingly unending news detailing allegations of sexual impropriety against politicians, celebrities, the news media, and other public figures. As a wave of victims march forward and social movements such as the #MeToo silence breakers grow, there are no signs that sexual harassment claims will subside. There is little doubt that companies and individuals across all industries have and will continue to see an increasing share of similar charges. As companies continue to address this crisis and attempt to protect their brand reputation from tarnishing, they may find some economic relief from their Employment Practices Liability Insurance (“EPLI”) coverage. Continue reading “Insurance Coverage for Workplace Sexual Harassment Claims”

Insurance Coverage for the Opioid Crisis

Amy J. Spencer

With the “opioid epidemic” at an all-time high—and the resulting news coverage and public awareness also at an all-time high—now is the time for pharmaceutical companies, pharmacists, hospitals, doctors, first responders, and employers to review their professional liability and general liability insurance policies and any other potentially applicable policies such as products liability and directors and officers (“D&O”) insurance. Continue reading “Insurance Coverage for the Opioid Crisis”

Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part II

Amy J. Spencer

In Part I of this two-part series, I identified first-party and third-party insurance claims that could result from a cyber event or attack on the Smart Grid. In this part, I examine how insurance policy language governs resolution of these claims and how to minimize gaps in coverage.

Examine Your Insurance Policies

Traditionally, third-party losses are covered by a company’s commercial general liability (“CGL”) policy. To qualify for coverage under a CGL policy, the policyholder typically must be confronted with a claim for “bodily injury” to another person or “physical injury to tangible property” (collectively known as “Coverage A”), or with a claim for “personal and advertising injury” (injury arising out of certain enumerated offenses such as malicious prosecution or invasion of privacy) (“Coverage B”). Various disputes have arisen as to whether cyber-related losses fit within these coverages. Continue reading “Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part II”

Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part I

Amy J. Spencer

In this part of our two-part series, I identify the types and breadth of insurance claims that can result from a cyber breach or cyberattack on technologies deployed in the Smart Grid industry. These claims can affect a full range of entities and individuals, including electric utilities implementing Smart Grid technology, energy consumers, Smart Grid technology suppliers, and their individual officers and directors. Continue reading “Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part I”

Insurance Recovery for Losses Related to Hurricane Harvey

Jared Zola, John D. Heintz, and Justin F. Lavella

 

 

 

Insurance for Property Damage and Business Interruption Losses

Businesses and communities throughout Texas and the Gulf Coast are bracing for the impact of Hurricane Harvey that is expected to wreak havoc this weekend. Harvey is unique because it quickly and unexpectedly transformed from what was predicted to be a smaller-scale storm to a Category 2 hurricane—and may be upgraded to Category 3 before it makes landfall. This transformation has left many major businesses and facilities in the storm’s expected path with significantly less time to prepare, and in some cases shutdown operation, than would ordinarily be expected. Continue reading “Insurance Recovery for Losses Related to Hurricane Harvey”

Policyholders (and the Courts) Continue to Ignore Section 1123 When Analyzing Insured v. Insured Exclusions

Justin F. Lavella and Kyle P. Brinkman

Last month the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued its anticipated decision in Indian Harbor Insurance v. Zucker, affirming a 2016 decision from a federal district court in Michigan that an Insured v. Insured (“IVI”) exclusion bars coverage for a claim brought by a post-bankruptcy litigation trustee for the benefit of the insured debtors’ creditors. The district court’s Indian Harbor decision was driven largely by the mistaken conclusion that a post-bankruptcy trustee is an ordinary assignee of the debtor company—an insured—and therefore purportedly stands in the shoes of the insured debtor for purposes of the IVI exclusion. As we described at the time, that decision, however, ignores the fundamentally different nature of transfers pursuant to Bankruptcy Code Section 1123 when compared to ordinary assignments pursuant to state contract law and the fact that a post-bankruptcy trustee assumes special powers as an estate representative. Unfortunately, after appeal, this issue still remains unresolved.

Continue reading “Policyholders (and the Courts) Continue to Ignore Section 1123 When Analyzing Insured v. Insured Exclusions”