American Tooling and Medidata: The Latest Rulings on Coverage for Phishing Scams

Amy J. Spencer

“Phishing” is a scheme in which criminals use spoofed e-mails, copycat websites, or other deceptive communications to trick unwitting companies or individuals into sharing valuable personal information or into wiring money to sham bank accounts.[1] As these schemes become unfortunately more common and sophisticated, companies are increasingly turning to their insurance policies to cover their monetary losses. However, many businesses that have purchased crime insurance to cover this type of “computer fraud” may not realize that e-mail-based thefts are not always covered. Businesses may reasonably assume that coverage exists under a crime insurance policy covering computer fraud because the loss is computer related, but insurance companies will likely insist on proof of a direct causal relationship between the computer fraud and the loss of funds before providing coverage.

The American Tooling case is the most recent pronouncement from the courts on “computer fraud” coverage. On July 13, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled in favor of the policyholder and reversed the Michigan district court’s grant of summary judgment to Travelers Casualty and Surety Company of America. Am. Tooling Ctr., Inc. v. Travelers Cas. & Sur. Co. of Am., No. 17-2014, 2018 WL 3404708, — F.3d. — (6th Cir. July 13, 2018). Continue readingAmerican Tooling and Medidata: The Latest Rulings on Coverage for Phishing Scams”

Insurance Coverage for the Opioid Crisis

Amy J. Spencer

With the “opioid epidemic” at an all-time high—and the resulting news coverage and public awareness also at an all-time high—now is the time for pharmaceutical companies, pharmacists, hospitals, doctors, first responders, and employers to review their professional liability and general liability insurance policies and any other potentially applicable policies such as products liability and directors and officers (“D&O”) insurance. Continue reading “Insurance Coverage for the Opioid Crisis”

Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part II

Amy J. Spencer

In Part I of this two-part series, I identified first-party and third-party insurance claims that could result from a cyber event or attack on the Smart Grid. In this part, I examine how insurance policy language governs resolution of these claims and how to minimize gaps in coverage.

Examine Your Insurance Policies

Traditionally, third-party losses are covered by a company’s commercial general liability (“CGL”) policy. To qualify for coverage under a CGL policy, the policyholder typically must be confronted with a claim for “bodily injury” to another person or “physical injury to tangible property” (collectively known as “Coverage A”), or with a claim for “personal and advertising injury” (injury arising out of certain enumerated offenses such as malicious prosecution or invasion of privacy) (“Coverage B”). Various disputes have arisen as to whether cyber-related losses fit within these coverages. Continue reading “Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part II”

Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part I

Amy J. Spencer

In this part of our two-part series, I identify the types and breadth of insurance claims that can result from a cyber breach or cyberattack on technologies deployed in the Smart Grid industry. These claims can affect a full range of entities and individuals, including electric utilities implementing Smart Grid technology, energy consumers, Smart Grid technology suppliers, and their individual officers and directors. Continue reading “Be Smart about Insurance for the Smart Grid: Coverage for Losses from Cyber Events—Part I”